Prenate® Restore: The First Prescription Prenatal Vitamin with Probiotics

Prenatal Vitamin with ProbioticsBy definition, prenatal nutrition addresses the nutrition recommendations for women before and during pregnancy. But with the stress of childbirth and the challenges of caring for an infant , moms can forget that their postnatal nutrition is also important.

Nutrition for Breastfeeding Moms and Babies

Because of the numerous benefits to mothers and their babies, breastfeeding exclusively for one to six months after delivery is recommended by both the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Academy of Pediatrics. These groups also recommend that mothers continue breastfeeding as other foods are introduced in months 7 to 12.1,2

Moms who breastfeed need increased nutritional intake to restore their reserves and support infant growth.3,4 During this time, nutrients are preferentially partitioned to mammary glands at the expense of maternal reserves.

Restore Mom, Nurture Baby

Prenate® Restore is a prenatal and postnatal vitamin with probiotics and 11 nutrient forms important nutrients. Its ingredients were selected to support the nutritional needs of mom and baby during pregnancy and postpartum, and specifically while breastfeeding. You can view the full ingredients list of ingredients in the chart to the right, as well as information about the specific benefits of some of the key ingredients in Prenate® Restore.

Prenatal Vitamins with ProbioticsKey Ingredients

  • Folic Acid – There are two forms of folate in Prenate® Restore: L-methylfolate and folic acid. In the United States, up to 53% of women have impaired folic acid metabolism from a common genetic mutation.5 This means that they are unable to process folic acid. The L-methyfolate in Prenate® Restore is bioavailable for all women regardless of genetic status.6
  • Vitamin D – Prenate® Restore also contains a level of vitamin D that meets or exceeds expert recommendations for this mineral.7,8 Vitamin D enables bone growth, promotes calcium absorption and influences skeletal and neurological development.7-11
  • Calcium – There are two forms of calcium in Prenate® Restore: calcium formate (in the form of Formical®) and calcium carbonate. Formical® is absorbed more rapidly and more efficiently by the body than other forms.12 Bone mass that is often lost during breastfeeding may be replenished by calcium formate, which is more bioavailable than citrate or carbonate.12,13
  • DHA – Women lose 50% of omega-3 stores during pregnancy. Prenate® Restore contains 400 mg of DHA, the most of any Prenate® vitamin, to help moms replenish those lost reserves.14 For mom, DHA reduces the risk of postpartum depression and improves sleep patterns.18-21 For baby, DHA improves cognitive and immune development, improves motor skills and inflammatory responses.14-17
  • Probiotics – Prenate® Restore contains probiotics Bacillus coagulans in the form of LactoSpore®. Probiotics support gastrointestinal and immune health in baby and mom. For baby, the probiotics create an environment that supports the body’s immune response to allergens.22 Probiotics also colonize the gut and keep bacteria in balance, which can protect the baby from pathogens and prevent diarrhea.22-24 For mom, probiotics reduce intestinal gas and incidences of diarrhea.25,26 Moms also experience the benefit of keeping the good and bad bacteria in the gut in balance.

Prenatal Vitamin with Probiotics for All Stages of Pregnancy

Prenate® Restore is a once-a-day, lactose-free, gluten-free and sugar-free softgel. It is a prenatal vitamin with probiotics that supports expecting mothers during pregnancy and postpartum, and specifically while breastfeeding. Prenate® Restore also can help your baby achieve optimal physical growth and promotes brain, immune system and gut development.27-29
In addition to providing nutritional support for mothers and babies, the Prenate® Vitamin Family offers prenatal vitamin coupons for Prenate® Restore. Click here to get your coupon now and pay only $10 per prescription refill! Talk to your doctor today to see if Prenate® Restore is right for you.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PRE- VENT ANY DISEASE.

REFERENCES
1.Breastfeeding: maternal and fetal aspects. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 361. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecolo- gists. Obstet Gynecol 2007 (Reaffirmed 2013); 109:479-480. 2. Eidelman A, Schanler RJ. Policy Statement: Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk. Pediatrics. 2012; 129(3):e827-e841.DOI: 10.1542/peds.2011-3552. 3. Picciano MF. Pregnancy and lactation: Physiological adjustments, nutritional requirements and the role of dietary supplements. J Nutr. 2003; 133(6) (suppl):1997-2002. 4. Breastfeeding report card: United States 2014. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site. http://www.cdc.gov/breast- feeding/pdf/2014breastfeedingreportcard.pdf. Published July 2014. Accessed April 17, 2015. 5. Molloy A, Daly S, Mills J, et al. Thermolabile variant of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase associated with low red-cell folates: implications for folate intake recommendations. Lancet. 1997; 349:1591–93. 6. Czeizel AE, Dudás I, Paput L, Bánhidy F. Prevention of neural-tube defects with periconceptional folic acid, methylfolate, or multivitamins? Ann Nutr Metab. 2011; 58(4):263–271. 7. COG. FAQ 001: Nutrition During Pregnancy. ACOG Website. http://www.acog.org/-/media/For-Patients/faq001. pdf?dmc=1&ts=20150218T1515531099. Published September 2013. Accessed February 18, 2015. 8. AAP. Statement of Endorsement: Dietary reference intakes for calcium and vita- min D. Pediatrics. 2012; 130:e1424. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-2590 9. AAP. Statement of Endorsement: Dietary reference intakes for calcium and vitamin D. Pediatrics. 2012; 130:e1424. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-2590 10. Dror D. Vitamin D in pregnancy. In: Watson RR, ed. Handbook of vitamin D in human health: Prevention treatment and toxicity. Human Health Handbooks. Vol. 4. The Nether- lands: Wageningen Academic Publishers; 2013:670-691 11. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Vitamin D. Office of Dietary Supple- ments, NIH Web site. http://ods.od.nih. gov/pdf/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional.pdf#h4. Reviewed November 10, 2014. Accessed April 17, 2015 12. Hanzlik RP, Fowler SC, Fisher DH. Relative bioavailability of calcium from calcium formate, calcium citrate, and calcium carbonate. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2005; 313(3):1217-1222. 13. Pregnancy, breastfeeding and bone health. NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center Website. http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bone/ Bone_Health/Pregnancy/pregnancy_bone_health.pdf. Published January 2012. Accessed April 17, 2014. 14. McGregor JA, French JI. Optimizing perinatal and maternal nutrition: omega-3 fatty acids and folic acid. Female Patient. 2008; (Suppl):19-23. 15. Carlson S. Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation in pregnancy and lactation. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009; 89(Suppl):678–684. 16. Greenberg JA, Bell SJ, Van Ausdal W. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy. Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2008; 1(4)(Suppl):162-169. 17. Prescott SL, Barden AE, Mori TA, Dunstan JA. Maternal fish oil supplementation in pregnancy modifies neonatal leukotriene produc- tion by cord-blood-derived neutrophils. Clin Sci. 2007; 113:409–416. 18. Cheruku SR, Montgomery-Downs HE, Farkas SL, Thoman EB, Lammi-Keefe CJ. Higher maternal plasma docosahexaenoic acid during pregnancy is associated with more mature neonatal sleep-state patterning. Amer J Clin Nutr. 2002; 76:608-613. 19. Akabas SR, Deckelbaum RJ. Summary of a workshop on n_3 fatty acids: current status of recommendations and future directions. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006; 83(Sup- pl):1536S– 1538S. 20. Wojcicki JM, Heyman MB. Maternal omega-3 fatty acid supplementation and risk for perinatal maternal depression. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2011; 24(5): 680–686. 21. Markhus MW, Skotheim S, Graff IE, et al. Low omega-3 index in pregnancy is a possible biological risk factor for postpartum depression. PLoS ONE. 2013; 8(7) e67617:1-12. doi:10.1371/journal. pone.0067617. 22. Huurre A, Laitinen K, Rautava S, Korkeamaki M, Isolauri E. Impact of maternal atopy and probiotic supplementation during pregnancy on infant sensitiza- tion: A double-blind placebo-controlled study. Clin Exp Allergy. 2008; 38:1342–1348. 23. Kalliomaki M, Antoine JM, Udo H, Rijkers GT, Wells JM, Mercenier A. Guidance for substantiating the evidence for beneficial effects of probiotics: prevention and manage- ment of allergic diseases by probiotics. J Nutr. 2010; 140(suppl):713S–721S. 24. Chandra RK. Effect of Lactobaccilus on the inci- dence and severity of acute rotavirus diarrhoea in infants. A prospective placebo-controlled double-blind study. Nutr Res. 2002; 22(1):65-69. 25. Kalman DS, Schwartz HI, Alvarez P, Feldman S, Pezzullo JC, Krieger DR. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel-group dual site trial to evaluate the effects of a Bacillus coagulans-based product on functional intestinal gas symptoms. BMC Gastroenterol. 2009; 9:85. doi:10.1186/1471-230X-9-85. 26. Cui YL, Won FC, Tan DL, Wu SH. Efficacy of Bacillus coagulans tablets in the treatment of acute and chronic diarrhea. Int J Immunother. 2004. 20(1):17-22. 27. Koo WW, Warren L. Calcium and bone health in infants. Neonatal Netw. 2003; 22(5):23-37. 28. Helen IB, Smith L, Saarem K, Saugstad OD, Drevon CA. Maternal supplementation with very-long-chain n-3 fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation augments children’s IQ at 4 years of age. Pediatrics 2003; 111(1):e39-e44. 29. Hurry A, Laitinen K, Rautava S, Korkeamaki M, Isolauri E. Impact of maternal atopy and probiotic supplementation during pregnancy on infant sensitization: A double-blond placebo-controlled study. In Exp Allergy. 2008; 38:1342-1348.

Heartburn and Pregnancy: What You Should Know

PrenateHeartburn_v1It can strike at night, first thing in the morning, after a meal or throughout the day. Heartburn is something that women often experience during pregnancy. In fact, more than half of all pregnant women report symptoms of severe heartburn, particularly during their second and third trimesters.1 The irritating and burning sensation through the chest and up through the esophagus can be severe and painful.

What Causes Heartburn During Pregnancy?

Heartburn occurs when stomach acid backs up into the esophagus, which is the tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach.2 Women who are pregnant can get heartburn from the same things as women who are not pregnant. Some of the most common causes of heartburn include spicy or greasy foods, carbonated drinks, coffee and other caffeinated drinks, tomato-based foods, and fatty foods.

Pregnant women are more prone to heartburn because of the changes occurring in their bodies. As the uterus grows it can crowd the stomach, pushing stomach acid upward.1 Hormonal changes also play a role.. In a normal pregnancy, progesterone levels continually increase. During the second trimester, progesterone levels nearly double. They reach their maximum in the third trimester, just before delivery. Higher levels of progesterone cause the valve in the throat to relax and stomach acid to enter the esophagus.1 That’s why women in their second and third trimesters more often report symptoms of heartburn. 

Help Reduce Heartburn Frequency During Pregnancy

While heartburn may be common during pregnancy, there are some changes that women can make to help reduce its symptoms.

    • Eat smaller meals throughout the day.
    • Drink plenty of fluids before and after meals, but limit fluid intake while eating. 
    • Ask a health care provider about antacids.
    • Adjust sleeping positions to elevate the head and lay on the left side .
    • Avoid trigger foods, such as fried, greasy, acidic and spicy foods.

Prescription Prenatal Vitamins to Supplement Prenatal Nutrition

Eliminating certain foods and beverages is one way to reduce the symptoms and incidences of heartburn. During pregnancy, a well-balanced diet is even more important than usual as mothers-to-be are eating to support the nutritional needs of their babies, too. The Prenate® Vitamin Family is committed to promoting women’s health. Prenate® Vitamins can help support mother and baby throughout pregnancy and through labor and delivery. Even with a balanced and healthy diet, many women have trouble meeting their daily recommended intakes for certain vitamins and minerals. Talk to your doctor to see if a prenatal vitamin may be right for you to help fill nutritional gaps.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

REFERENCES:

1.Todd N. 2014. Heartburn during pregnancy. WebMD Website. Retrieved on June 8, 2016 from http://www.webmd.com/heartburn-gerd/guide/heartburn-during-pregnancy 2. Mayo Clinic. 2016. Diseases and Conditions: Heartburn. May Clinic Website. Retrieved on June 8, 2016 from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heartburn/basics/risk-factors/con-20019545.

Summer Activities for Expecting Moms

School’s out and summer is in full swing. As the weather warms up and vacations start to fill up the calendar, expecting moms need to be cautious about how they are spending their spare time. Pregnancy doesn’t mean that women have to miss out on all the fun. But slight alterations in summer activities may be needed to ensure the safety of both mom and baby. Check out our tips that every expecting mom should keep in mind this summer.

Amusement Parks 

Summer is the peak time for families to head to their local amusement park for fun-filled days of rides and other attractions. However, women who are pregnant should skip the rollercoasters or fast-moving rides with high peaks and valleys or sharp turns. Such jarring motions and pressure against the body may cause the placenta to separate from the uterus. This could cause difficulties with the pregnancy for both mom and baby. Women who are expecting should opt instead for a leisurely ride on the Ferris wheel to seek some thrills at the amusement park. They should also follow signs posted next to rides that warn of dangers to pregnant women..   

Daily Cardio

As a general rule, expecting moms should incorporate light to moderate cardiovascular activity into their daily routines. But they should stick with walks of 30 to 45 minutes. If jogging was part of an exercise regimen before pregnancy, light to moderate jogging while pregnant should be OK. Expecting moms should check with a health care provider for a recommended exercise regimen. They also should avoid contact sports for their cardio workouts. Unfortunately, many contact and team sports may involve direct hits to the abdomen. This type of trauma can be harmful to the baby during pregnancy.

Stretching and Flexibility

Staying loose and limber throughout pregnancy may help with labor and an easier pregnancy in general. Prenatal yoga is an excellent option to stretch and lengthen muscles, tendons and ligaments. Some poses are specifically targeted for the needs of expecting mothers. Plus, yoga focuses on relaxation and meditation. This may come in handy before and during labor and delivery. Avoid gymnastics or tumbling while pregnant. Such activities require a great deal of twisting and turning, are higher impact exercises, and often involve jerking or inversions. These types of motions may be dangerous to mom and baby during pregnancy.

Horseback Riding

For some women, horseback riding is not just a fun hobby; it’s their livelihood. Unfortunately it is high on the list of activities that should be avoided during pregnancy. Even for experienced riders, falling or being thrown from a horse is part of the process. Low impact aerobics can help keep the same muscle groups toned, but eliminate the possibility of falling or being thrown. It’s important to note that pregnant women should avoid high impact aerobics, as it involves extensive jumping, hopping and bouncing.

Relaxation

Soaking in a sauna or hot tub on a summer night may sound like the perfect way to unwind from a busy day. But pregnant women should opt for a prenatal massage or pedicure to de-stress. According to the Mayo Clinic, just 10 minutes in a hot tub can raise the body’s internal temperature to 102 degrees Fahrenheit. Studies have shown an increased risk of neural tube defects, which are serious abnormalities of the brain or spinal cord, in babies of women who experience high temperatures during the first four to six weeks of pregnancy.1

Water Sports

Swimming is perfectly suited for women who are pregnant. It’s an excellent way to keep the body toned without adding stress to joints. Swimming can be especially beneficial in the second and third trimesters as moms-to-be start carrying more weight as the baby develops. Swimming also provides cardiovascular benefits. But water sports associated with a risk of falling, such as surfing or skiing, should be avoided. In addition, scuba diving is not recommended during pregnancy. When ascending to the surface from a dive, the body must decompress. This process can create gas bubbles in the baby’s blood, which can cause many health problems.2

Nutritional Support for Mothers & Babies

As moms-to-be are busy this summer having fun with family and friends, their prenatal nutrition is important as ever. Regular prenatal checkups and nutrition should not be sacrificed as the summer calendar starts to fill up. The Prenate® Vitamin Family is committed to promoting women’s health in every season. Prenate® Vitamins can help support mother and baby throughout pregnancy and through labor and delivery. Even with a balanced and healthy diet, many women have trouble meeting their daily recommended intakes for certain vitamins and minerals. Talk to your doctor to see if a prenatal vitamin may be right for you to help fill nutritional gaps.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

Prenate_SummerActivities_v1

REFERENCES:

1. Wick M. Is it safe to use a hot tub during pregnancy? Mayo Clinic Website. Nov 10 2015. Retrieved on June 1, 2016 from http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/expert-answers/pregnancy-and-hot-tubs/faq-20057844. 2. US Department of Health and Human Services: Office of Women’s Health. Pregnancy: You’re pregnant: Now what? Staying Healthy and Safe. Office of Women’s Health Website. Sept 27, 2010. Retrieved on June 1, 2016 from http://womenshealth.gov/pregnancy/you-are-pregnant/staying-healthy-safe.html#pubs.

Blueberries: Superfood with Benefits for Pregnancy and Beyond

Blueberries_v1Blueberries are a simple and healthy food that can brighten just about any meal. Now is the perfect time to enjoy blueberries as they are in season and less expensive than at other times of the year. The summer of 2015 marked the 100-year anniversary of the first commercially grown crop of blueberries.1 Since that time, these little blue dynamos have been gaining in popularity and providing numerous health benefits to pregnant women. 

Vitamin C

One of the most prevalent nutrients found in blueberries is vitamin C. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, pregnant and lactating women need 60 mg of vitamin C per day.2 A single serving of fresh blueberries, just 1/2 cup, provides 10 percent of the daily recommended value.3 Vitamin C works as an antioxidant in the body to combat free radicals and protect our cells.4 It plays a role in healing wounds, boosting the immune system, and helping our bodies absorb iron efficiently. Iron absorption is extremely important during pregnancy because a woman’s blood volume expands rapidly to support the growing needs of her baby. 

Folate

During preconception and early pregnancy, folate is perhaps the most critical nutrient that women should consume. Folate is the naturally occurring form of folic acid, and it plays a major role in the baby’s neural tube development. Complete neural tube closure is needed for the baby’s spinal cord to develop properly. This closure occurs very early in a pregnancy – by 28 days post-conception.5 For this reason , it is recommended that pregnant women consume 800 mcg (0.8 mg) of folate per day.2 While a 1/2-cup serving of fresh blueberries only provides 5 mcg of folate, every bit helps in meeting daily goals.6

Potassium

A 1/2-cup serving of fresh blueberries provides 57 g of potassium.6 Potassium helps the body maintain fluids and keep electrolytes balanced. During pregnancy women experience a massive increase in blood volume, making their electrolyte balance that much more important. Because of this, women who are pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant should increase their potassium consumption to 4700 mg of potassium per day.7 When electrolytes get out of balance, the body becomes dehydrated, which can lead to muscle cramping or tightness.

Fiber

Women who are pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant should consume at least 25 g of fiber each day.7 A single serving of fresh blueberries provides 2 g of fiber, or a moderate 8 percent of daily recommended value.3 For everyone, fiber aids in digestion and may help alleviate constipation. But there are additional benefits for pregnant women. Some studies suggest that eating the daily recommended amount of fiber may reduce the risk of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia.8

Blueberry Extract Benefits in Prenatal Vitamins 

Because of the many health benefits of blueberries and the flavor enhancement they provide, several of the prenatal vitamins in the Prenate® Vitamin Family contain blueberry extract, including:

    • Prenate® Pixie
    • Prenate Mini®
    • Prenate® Chewable

The blueberry extract, along with the antioxidants vitamin C and vitamin E, help prevent omega-3 “burp back” that can occur when taking a multivitamin. 9-12

The Prenate® Vitamin Family is committed to promoting women’s health. Prenate® Vitamins can help support mother and baby throughout pregnancy and through labor and delivery. Even with a balanced and healthy diet, many women have trouble meeting their daily recommended intakes for certain vitamins and minerals. Talk to your doctor to see if a prenatal vitamin may be right for you to help fill nutritional gaps.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

REFERENCES:

1. U.S. Highbush Blue berry Council. 2016. Blueberry Council Website. Retrieved on June 1, 2016 from: http://www.blueberrycouncil.org/. 2. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dietary Supplement Labeling Guide: Appendix C. Daily Values for Infants, Children Less Than 4 Years of Age, and Pregnant and Lactating Women. April 2005. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/food/guidanceregulation/guidancedocumentsregulatoryinformation/dietarysupplements/ucm070620.htm on June 1, 2016. 3. United States Department of Agriculture. 2016. Seasonal Product Guide: Blueberries. SNAP-Ed Connection Website. Retrieved on June 1, 2016 from https://snaped.fns.usda.gov/nutrition-through-seasons/seasonal-produce/blueberries 4. National Institutes of Health, Vitamin C: Fact Sheet for Consumers. Retrieved April 19, 2015 from http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminC-Consumer.

5. Milman N. Intestinal absorption of folic acid – new physiologic & molecular aspects. The Indian Journal of Medical Research. 2012;136(5):725-728. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3573592/ on February 1, 2016. 6. U.S. Department of Agriculture. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 28. 2016. Retrieved on June 7, 2016 from https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/2166?fgcd=&manu=&lfacet=&format=&count=&max=35&offset=&sort=&qlookup=09050. 7. U.S Department of Health and Human Services & U.S. Department of Agriculture. Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015 – 2020. 8 Ed. Appendix 7. Nutritional Goals for Age-Sex Groups Based on Dietary Reference Intakes and Dietary Guidelines Recommendations. Retrieved on June 7, 2016 from http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/appendix-7/#table-a7-1-daily-nutritional-goals-for-age-sex-groups-based-on-d 8. Hitti M. 2006. Planning a Pregnancy? Eat Your Fiber. WebMD Website. Retrieved on June 7, 2016 from http://www.webmd.com/baby/news/20060927/planning-pregnancy-eat-fiber. 9. Velioglu YS, Mazza G, Gao L, Oomah BD. Antioxidant activity and total phenolics in selected fruits, vegetables, and grain products. J Agric Food Chem. 1998; 46(10):4113-4117. 10. Castrejon ADR, Eichholz I, Rohn S, Kroh LW, Huyskens-Keil S. Phenolic profile and antioxidant activity of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) during fruit maturation and ripening. Food Chem. 2008; 109:564–572. 11. Dietary supplement fact sheet: Vitamin C. Office of Dietary Supplements, NIH Website. http://ods.od.nih.gov/pdf/factsheets/VitaminC-HealthProfessional.pdf. Reviewed June 5, 2013. Accessed December 28, 2014. 12. Dietary supplement fact sheet: Vitamin E. Office of Dietary Supplements, NIH Website. http://ods.od.nih.gov/pdf/factsheets/VitaminE-HealthProfessional.pdf. Reviewed June 13, 2014. Accessed December 28, 2014.

What You Need to Know About Preeclampsia

Preeclampsia_800x800_nofooterPreeclampsia is a condition that affects women who are pregnant, causing them to develop both high blood pressure and high protein levels in their urine. It occurs in 5 to 8% of all pregnancies, but is responsible for 20% of premature births in the United States.1

Signs and Symptoms

For many women, preeclampsia may be silent and have no obvious symptoms. A routine check during a prenatal visit may show elevated blood pressure and high protein in the urine. However, other women may experience some or all of these symptoms:

  • Swelling of Face, Eyes or Hands – Some swelling during pregnancy is normal, but excessive fluid buildup in the face, eyes or hands can be a concern. If an indentation remains for a few seconds after pressing around the face, eyes or hands, it may be an indication that excessive swelling is present.2
  • Headaches – Migraine-like headaches (dull, severe or throbbing) that just don’t seem to go away are cause for concern.2
  • Nausea and Vomiting – Morning sickness affects many women. However, nausea or vomiting after the first trimester and during mid-pregnancy may be linked to preeclampsia.2
  • Abdominal or Shoulder Pain – Pain in the upper right quadrant of the body should not be dismissed. Mothers experiencing pain under their ribs on the right side, or up through the shoulder on the right side, should notify their health care provider.2
  • Lower Back Pain – As pregnancy progresses, lower back pain is common due to the extra weight mothers are carrying. But lower back pain also can be an indicator of problems with the mother’s liver if preeclampsia is present.2
  • Sudden Weight Gain – Women should gain about two pounds per week throughout pregnancy. A sudden increase in weight from one week to the next, with no change in diet or exercise, may be a sign of preeclampsia. Damaged blood vessels, which may occur when preeclampsia is present, cause water to leak and stay in the body’s tissues instead of passing through the kidneys to be excreted in urine.2
  • Changes in Vision – Changes in vision, such as flashing lights, auras, light sensitivity, spots or blurry vision, should be reported to a health care provider immediately. They may indicate central nervous system issues or swelling of the brain.2
  • Hyperreflexia – This is an overreaction of the involuntary nervous system to stimulation. It may indicate changes to the central nervous system.2
  • Feelings of Anxiety or Shortness of Breath – A racing pulse, jittery feelings, mental confusion, shortness of breath or an elevated sense of anxiety may be symptoms of preeclampsia and indicate elevated blood pressure.2

Complications and Treatment

Left untreated and in severe cases, preeclampsia can be fatal to mothers and their babies. Elevated blood pressure may put mothers at risk for brain injury and impaired kidney and liver function, lead to blood clotting issues, cause a buildup of fluid in the lungs, and lead to seizures.3 The condition also affects blood flow to the placenta, which may lead to smaller or premature babies.3

The good news is that in the majority of cases, preeclampsia can be managed so that mothers recover once the condition subsides and their babies grow normally and are healthy after delivery. Proper prenatal care is essential in diagnosing and treating preeclampsia. Strict monitoring by the prenatal team and other health care providers is necessary. This includes tracking blood pressure, ordering lab tests to determine the condition of the mother’s liver, kidneys and blood clotting ability, and watching closely for indications of an impending seizure or stroke. In addition, the baby’s growth rate is monitored and stress tests are administered to evaluate how the baby is coping.

Causes of Preeclampsia

The cause of preeclampsia is not known. Scientists have determined that the placenta plays a key role in preeclampsia, and women with chronic hypertension and certain metabolic diseases, like diabetes, are more susceptible.3 There are some indicators that obesity is a major risk factor to a woman developing preeclampsia.3

Nutritional Support for Mothers & Babies

It is recommended that women who are thinking of becoming pregnant begin practicing healthy nutritional habits right away. Regular exercise and a balanced diet can help obese women achieve a healthy or normal body mass index (BMI). High BMI is linked to the genetic tendency for high blood pressure, diabetes and insulin resistance.3

Even with a balanced and healthy diet, many women have trouble meeting the daily recommended intakes for certain vitamins and minerals. Prenate® Vitamins can help support mother and baby throughout pregnancy and through labor and delivery. The Prenate® Vitamin Family is committed to promoting women’s health. Talk to your doctor to see if a prenatal vitamin may be right for you to help fill nutritional gaps.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

REFERENCES:
1. Preeclampsia Foundation. 2010. About Preeclampsia. Preeclampsia Foundation Website. Retrieved on May 16, 2016 from http:// http://www.preeclampsia.org/health-information/about-preeclampsia 2. Preeclampsia Foundation. 2016. Signs and Symptoms. Preeclampsia Foundation Website. Retrieved on May 16, 2016 from http://www.preeclampsia.org/health-information/sign-symptoms 3. Preeclampsia Foundation. 2013. Frequently Asked Questions. Preeclampsia Foundation Website. Retrieved on May 16, 2016 from http://www.preeclampsia.org/health-information/faqs#causes-preeclampsia

Essential Nutrients in Your Prenatal Diet: 1st Trimester

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During the first trimester of pregnancy rapid cell division and the foundation of the internal organs and central nervous system are developing. Perhaps the most critical time of a pregnancy, the first trimester requires essential nutrients to support the baby’s development. By this time women should eliminate alcohol and smoking from their daily routine. Eating a well-balanced diet with plenty of whole grains, veggies, fruit and lean protein can help support both mom and baby during the first trimester.

These essential nutrients should be included in every prenatal diet during the first trimester:

PrenatalNutrients-1stTrimester-blogelements-01Folic Acid

Leafy green vegetables, such as spinach and kale, are excellent natural sources of folic acid. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends that pregnant women consume 800 mcg of folate daily during pregnancy.1 Folic acid plays a critical role very early in pregnancy. The development and closure of a baby’s neural tube (which eventually becomes the spine) occurs between day 14 and day 28 of pregnancy. Folic acid levels impact neural tube closure and because this development occurs so early in pregnancy, a mom-to-be need to make sure she is consuming an adequate amount of folic acid before conception.

PrenatalNutrients-1stTrimester-blogelements-02Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 is found in a wide variety of foods, including nuts eggs and beans. Most Americans obtain their dietary vitamin B6 from fortified cereals, beef, poultry, starchy vegetables and non-citrus fruits.2 The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends that pregnant women consume 2.5 mg of vitamin B6 daily during pregnancy.1 It is estimated that nearly 85% of pregnant women suffer from common morning sickness, which is most prevalent during the first trimester.3 The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends vitamin B6 to help ease nausea, one of the symptoms associated with common morning sickness.4,5

PrenatalNutrients-1stTrimester-blogelements-03Iron

Lean red meats are naturally high in iron. Legumes, vegetables and grains are other natural sources. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends that pregnant women get 18 mg of iron daily.1 During pregnancy, a woman’s blood volume increases 50 percent and her need for hemoglobin is greater. Iron helps maintain a healthy immune system and prevents anemia. Iron is an essential mineral in the body’s formation of hemoglobin, the red protein in the blood that is responsible for transporting oxygen throughout the body. Sufficient iron helps a growing baby receive the amount of oxygen needed to develop a strong heart, lungs, and muscles. In addition, iron benefits a mother by helping boost her energy and helping keep her muscles, heart, lungs and other organs functioning healthfully.

PrenatalNutrients-1stTrimester-blogelements-04DHA

DHA is found naturally in fish, eggs and meats. Non-marine food sources that contain DHA include nuts, seeds, whole grains and dark leafy vegetables. Oily fish, like mackerel, herring, salmon and trout, typically contain 10-100 times more DHA than non-marine food sources.6 However, women who are pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant need to be extremely careful when consuming marine food sources that contain DHA. Many of these fish contain high levels of mercury, and high levels of mercury can be toxic for both pregnant women and developing babies. But DHA is essential for growth and functional development of an infant’s brain.7 During pregnancy DHA also helps with the baby’s length of gestation, and birth weight.8,9

Fill Nutritional Gaps with Prenatal Vitamins

While a balanced diet is preferred, some women may have trouble meeting their daily recommended intakes for certain vitamins and minerals. The Prenate® Vitamin Family offers a line of prenatal vitamins that are designed to carry moms and babies through preconception to pregnancy and into the weeks and months after delivery.

The Prenate® Vitamin Family help support expecting moms  with robust doses of key nutrients. Prenate® Pixie is a small softgel prenatal vitamin that can be taken before conception and is mighty enough to support mom and baby through pregnancy. Prenate Mini® is mini-sized but robust softgel prenatal supplement with 14 nutrient forms. Talk to your doctor to see if a prenatal vitamin may be right for you to help fill nutritional gaps.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

Infographic: Essential Nutrients in Your Prenatal Diet: 1st Trimester

PrenatalNutrients-1stTrimester

REFERENCES

1. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dietary Supplement Labeling Guide: Appendix C. Daily Values for Infants, Children Less Than 4 Years of Age, and Pregnant and Lactating Women. April 2005. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/food/guidanceregulation/guidancedocumentsregulatoryinformation/dietarysupplements/ucm070620.htm on April 6, 2016. 2. National Institutes of Health, Vitamin B6: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. Retrieved June 9, 2016 from https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB6-HealthProfessional/. 3. WebMD. Doing Battle with Morning Sickness. Retrieved on April 15, 2015. http://www.webmd.com/baby/features/battle-morning-sickness. 4. Morning sickness. Pregnancy FAQ 126. ACOG website. http://www.acog.org/-/media/For-Patients/faq126.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20150426T2004343387. October 2012. Accessed April 7, 2015. 5. Morantz C, Torrey B. Practice guideline briefs: Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. Am Fam Physician. 2004; 70(3):601. 6. Brewer, S. 2005. DHA – Brian Food. Healthspan. Retrieved on December 16, 2015 from http://

Steps for Better Health During Women’s Health Week: Sunday, May 8th – Saturday, May 14th

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This week women of every age across the country are challenging themselves to be healthy. National Women’s Heath Week is coordinated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office on Women’s Health. The goal is to empower every woman to make her health a priority, and steps she can take to improve her health.

Better Health for Every Age

There are some basic steps that you can take to improve your physical and mental health:

    • Get a well-woman check-up and preventative screenings
    • Get active by doing at least 30 minutes of physical activity each day
    • Eat healthy
    • Support your mental health with managing stress and getting plenty of sleep
    • Avoid risky behaviors like smoking, excessive drinking, or texting while driving

As you age your health needs change. All women need to focus on their general health and prevention of diseases and adverse health conditions. But women in their childbearing years need to make their reproductive and sexual health a priority. In addition to screenings for sexually transmitted diseases and a Pap test, you should start a conversation with your doctor about your plans for having children.1,2,3 Almost one out of two pregnancies (45%) is unplanned.4 You should talk to your doctors about family planning and birth control.

If you’re pregnant, your prenatal care can also be part of a well-woman visit. There are certain tests during pregnancy that are recommended to check both mom and baby’s health. As you move into your 40s and 50s the conversation with your health care provider will shift to perimenopausal and menopausal symptoms.3,5

The Women’s Health website provides excellent checklists for women at every age. Click below to download and print specific steps for better health for your age:   

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Take the Pledge for Better Health

In an effort to bring about better health for women across the county, the Office of Women’s Health is challenging women to take the National Women’s Health Week Pledge. In doing so women pledge to take at least one step to improve their health. For women who are pregnant this is an excellent opportunity to take care of yourself and also give your baby a healthy start to life.

TAKE THE PLEDGE>> 

Nutritional Support for Mothers & Babies

The Prenate® Vitamin Family is committed to promoting women’s health. Prenate® Vitamins can help support mother and baby throughout pregnancy and through labor and delivery.  Even with a balanced and healthy diet, many women have trouble meeting their daily recommended intakes for certain vitamins and minerals. Talk to your doctor to see if a prenatal vitamin may be right for you to help fill nutritional gaps.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

REFERENCES:

1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health. Steps for better health by age: Your 20s. Women’s Health Website. Retrieved on May 3, 2016 from http://womenshealth.gov/nwhw/by-age/20s/# 2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health. Steps for better health by age: Your 30s. Women’s Health Website. Retrieved on May 3, 2016 from http://womenshealth.gov/nwhw/by-age/30s/# 3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health. Steps for better health by age: Your 40s. Women’s Health Website. Retrieved on May 3, 2016 from http://womenshealth.gov/nwhw/by-age/40s/# 4. Finer LB, Zola MR. Declines in Unintended Pregnancy in the United States, 2008 – 2001. N Engl J Med. 2016 Mar 3;374(9):843-52. Retrieved on May 4, 2016 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26962904. 5. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health. Steps for better health by age: Your 50s. Women’s Health Website. Retrieved on May 3, 2016 from http://womenshealth.gov/nwhw/by-age/50s/#