Probiotics: Support for Immune Health, Easing Gas, and Colic Symptoms

Probiotics are a form of “good bacteria” that help maintain the balance of organisms in the gut, stomach and intestinal tract. Our bodies naturally contain both good and bad bacteria. When the balance gets out of whack, the bad bacteria take over and people can experience some not-so-pleasant symptoms. Those include an upset stomach, nausea, and irregular bowel movements, to name a few.

Babies are susceptible to the same balancing act of the good and bad bacteria in their gut. Colic, acid reflux and constipation are the most common gastrointestinal issues that infants experience.1

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Breastfeeding Plays a Role In Digestive Health

Women that breastfeed have to be mindful of what they consume. Their baby is reliant on them for nutrients, particularly during the first few months of life. When women breastfeed, the nutrients are preferentially partitioned to the mammary glands. This is nature’s way of making sure that infants obtain the vital nutrients they need to survive. Certain foods can be dangerous to babies, including alcohol, high levels of caffeine or fish with high mercury content. Other foods, like broccoli or strong herbs and spices, may cause gas and colic symptoms. You can learn more about foods to avoid while breastfeeding in previous posts:

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Probiotics Support Mom and Baby While Breastfeeding

While moms have to be mindful of what to avoid, certain things should be included in their diet while breastfeeding. Probiotics safely and gently promote a healthy digestive system that supports immune function.2 Probiotics are found naturally in certain yogurts and fermented foods. Both moms and babies benefit from these little microbes. Probiotics help regulate the microbes in the gut and support gastrointestinal and immune health.

Some studies show that they may also help with occasional gas, diarrhea and constipation. A study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, showed that over three months, the babies who received probiotics had significantly shorter crying spells and less stomach upset than the babies given the placebo.1

The full extent of the benefit of probiotics is not yet known. Research is ongoing but to date, studies have shown that a daily probiotic may have the following benefits:

  • Promote digestive health and regulate the movement of food through the intestines2
  • Improved immune system health2
  • Promote a strengthened and more resilient stomach lining2
  • Deter the growth of bad bacteria in the gut lining2
  • Help improve the body’s ability, through its metabolization of food, to produce B vitamins and to extract certain nutrients and minerals, which may promote healthier skin and nerve function2

Vitamins to Supplement Mom & Baby Postpartum

For breastfeeding moms, probiotic supplementation can provide benefits to mom and baby. Prenate® Restore is a once-daily, lactose-free and gluten-free soft gel vitamin that supports expecting mothers during pregnancy and postpartum, specifically while breastfeeding. While it’s designed to support the needs of breastfeeding moms and their babies, it is also appropriate during pregnancy, which means expecting moms can start supplementation before the arrival of their babies and continue through delivery and postpartum. Prenate® Restore can also help infants achieve optimal physical growth and promote brain, immune system and gut development.3-5

To help provide nutritional support for mothers and babies, the Prenate® Vitamin Family offers prenatal vitamin coupons for Prenate® Restore. Click here to get your coupon now and pay only $10 per prescription refill! Talk to your doctor to see if Prenate® Restore may be right for you to help fill nutritional gaps.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

REFERENCES: 1. Reinberg S. 2014. Probiotic Drops Might Ease Colic Study. WebMD Website. Retrieved August 9, 2016 from http:// http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/news/20140113/probiotic-drops-might-ease-colic-study. 2. American Gastrointestinal Association. 2008. Probiotics: What They Are and What They Can Do for You. Retrieved October 3, 2014 from http://www.gastro.org/patient- center/diet-medications/probiotics 3. Koo WW, Warren L. Calcium and bone health in infants. Neonatal Netw. 2003; 22(5):23-37. 4. Helen IB, Smith L, Saarem K, Saugstad OD, Drevon CA. Maternal supplementation with very-long-chain n-3 fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation augments children’s IQ at 4 years of age. Pediatrics 2003; 111(1):e39-e44. 5. Hurry A, Laitinen K, Rautava S, Korkeamaki M, Isolauri E. Impact of maternal atopy and probiotic supplementation during pregnancy on infant sensitization: A double-blond placebo-controlled study. In Exp Allergy. 2008; 38:1342-1348.

Foods to Avoid While Breastfeeding

prenate_foodstoavoidbreastfeeding_fbBreastfeeding has many benefits for both mothers and babies. Colostrum, the first secretion of the mammary glands, is thick, yellow and packed with nutrients and antibodies that are important for babies in the first days of life. As babies grow, their mothers’ breast milk changes. By the third to fifth day after delivery, breast milk has thinned and has just the right amount of fat, sugar, water and protein needed to help babies grow.1

The cells, hormones and antibodies in breast milk reduce the risk of numerous diseases, including lower respiratory infections, asthma and diabetes.1

In addition to helping fight diseases, breast milk is easy for babies to digest. The foods that mothers consume are passed to their babies through breast milk. While most babies are able to digest breast milk easily, there are some foods that moms should avoid or limit while breastfeeding:

    • Alcohol – There is no level of alcohol that is considered safe for babies who are breastfed. While breastfeeding mothers can consume an occasional alcoholic drink, moderate to heavy drinking is not recommended. More than one drink at a time increases the chance that alcohol will get in the breast milk supply. Mothers should avoid breast-feeding until alcohol has completely cleared out from their breast milk. This typically takes two to three hours for 12 ounces of 5 percent beer, 5 ounces of 11 percent wine, or 1.5 ounces of 40 percent liquor, depending on a woman’s body weight.2 “Pumping and dumping” doesn’t speed the elimination of alcohol from the body.
    • Caffeine – Too much caffeine can interfere with babies’ sleep or make them fussy. Babies are not able to process caffeine as easily as adults. So too much caffeine can end up making babies irritated or cranky.
    • Fish High in Mercury  – Breastfeeding moms do not need to avoid eating fish altogether. In fact, many types of fish contain DHA and other omega-3 fatty acids that are beneficial for mothers and babies. But mothers should be mindful of the mercury content in the fish they do eat. Essentially the same rules about mercury consumption during pregnancy apply while breastfeeding – one to two portions (6 ounces) per week of fish with a low mercury content.
    • Strong Spices – Some spices like peppermint and sage may reduce milk production. In addition, hot spices like cayenne or curries that can cause gastrointestinal irritation in adults can have similar effects on babies.

Vitamin Supplement for Mom & Baby While Breastfeeding

Clearly it is important to maintain a healthy diet while breastfeeding. But it’s often hard to obtain all there recommend nutrients from diet alone. Prenate® Restore is a once-daily, lactose- free and gluten-free soft gel vitamin that supports expecting mothers during pregnancy and postpartum, especially while they are breastfeeding.

To help provide nutritional support for mothers and babies, the Prenate® Vitamin Family  offers prenatal vitamin coupons for Prenate® Restore. Click here to get your coupon now and pay only $10 per prescription refill! Talk to your doctor to see if Prenate® Restore may be right for you to help fill nutritional gaps.

prenate_foodstoavoidbreastfeeding_pinterest

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

REFERENCES: 1. Your Guide to Breastfeeding. 2011. Department of Health and Human Resources Office of Women’s Health Web site https:// http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/breastfeeding-guide/breastfeedingguide-general-english.pdf. Published January 2011. Accessed July 21, 2015. 2. May Clinic. 2015. Breastfeeding nutrition: Tips for Mom. May Clinic Website. Retrieved on August 1, 2016 from http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/infant-and-toddler-health/in-depth/breastfeeding-nutrition/ art-20046912?pg=2.

Why Vitamin Supplementation Shouldn’t Stop Postpartum

prenate_postpartumvitamins_fbThere is a great deal of emphasis on prenatal vitamins and their importance during pregnancy. But many women may not realize the importance of consuming recommended nutrients postpartum and while breastfeeding.

Both the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend that mothers breastfeed their babies exclusively for up to six months after delivery.1,2 Because of the many benefits breastfeeding provides to both mothers and babies, the ACOG and the AAP recommend that new moms continue breastfeeding as other foods are introduced in months seven to 12.1,2

Babies who are breastfed exclusively depend on their mothers to provide the nutrients needed to support their growth and development. For this reason, moms who breastfeed their babies need increased nutritional intake to restore their reserves and support infant growth.3,4 When women breastfeed, the nutrients they consume are preferentially partitioned to mammary glands at the expense of their own reserves. This is nature’s way of ensuring that infants obtain the vital nutrients they need to survive.

Key Nutrients to Support Nutrition for Mom and Baby While Breastfeeding

While women are breastfeeding, they should pay particular attention to the amount of each of these nutrients they consume each day.

  • Calcium and Vitamin D – Because their infants’ vitamin D needs are so high, mothers often experience loss of bone mass while breastfeeding.5 Calcium and vitamin D work hand in hand to help keep mothers’ bones strong while their babies’ bones and teeth are developing.5
  • Probiotics – Both moms and babies benefit from these little microbes. Probiotics help regulate the microbes in the gut and support gastrointestinal and immune health in moms and babies.
  • DHA – Up to 50% of omega-3 stores are lost in pregnancy, and six months are needed to restore them postpartum.6 For moms, DHA can help reduce the risk of postpartum depression and improve infant sleep.7-10 For babies, DHA can improve cognitive and motor skills.6,11-13 Plus, DHA aids in immune development and reduces inflammatory responses.6,11-13
  • B Vitamins – As a natural energy booster, B vitamins can help moms adjust to the ‘round the clock schedules that comes with the arrival of any new baby.

Vitamins to Supplement Mom & Baby Postpartum

Prenate® Restore is a once-daily, lactose-free and gluten-free soft gel vitamin that supports expecting mothers during pregnancy and postpartum, specifically while breastfeeding. While it’s designed to support the needs of breastfeeding moms and their babies, it is also appropriate during pregnancy. This means expecting moms can start supplementation before the arrival of their babies and continue through delivery and postpartum. Prenate® Restore can help infants achieve optimal physical growth and promote brain, immune system and gut development.14-16

To help provide nutritional support for mothers and babies, the Prenate® Vitamin Family offers prenatal vitamin coupons for Prenate® Restore. Click here to get your coupon now and pay only $10 per prescription refill! Talk to your doctor to see if Prenate® Restore may be right for you to help fill nutritional gaps.

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THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

REFERENCES: 1. Breastfeeding: maternal and fetal aspects. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 361. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Obstet Gynecol 2007 (Reaffirmed 2013); 109:479-480. 2. Eidelman A, Schanler RJ. Policy Statement: Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk. Pediatrics. 2012; 129(3):e827-e841.DOI: 10.1542/peds.2011-3552. 3. Picciano MF. Pregnancy and lactation: Physiological adjustments, nutritional requirements and the role of dietary supplements. J Nutr. 2003; 133(6) (suppl): 1997-2002. 4. Breastfeeding report card: United States 2014. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site. http:// http://www.cdc.gov/breast- feeding/pdf/2014breastfeedingreportcard.pdf. Published July 2014. Accessed April 17, 2015. 5. Pregnancy, breastfeeding and bone health. NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center Website. http:// http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bone/Bone_Health/Pregnancy/pregnancy_bone_health.pdf. Published January 2012. Accessed April 17, 2014. 6. McGregor JA, French JI. Optimizing perinatal and maternal nutrition: omega-3 fatty acids and folic acid. Female Patient. 2008; (Suppl):19-23. 7. Cheruku SR, Montgomery-Downs HE, Farkas SL, Thoman EB, Lammi-Keefe CJ. Higher maternal plasma docosahexaenoic acid during pregnancy is associated with more mature neonatal sleep-state patterning. Amer J Clin Nutr. 2002; 76:608-613. 8. Akabas SR, Deckelbaum RJ. Summary of a workshop on n_3 fatty acids: current status of recommendations and future directions. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006; 83(Sup- pl):1536S– 1538S. 9. Wojcicki JM, Heyman MB. Maternal omega-3 fatty acid supplementation and risk for perinatal maternal depression. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2011; 24(5): 680–686. 10. Markhus MW, Skotheim S, Graff IE, et al. Low omega-3 index in pregnancy is a possible biological risk factor for postpartum depression. PLoS ONE. 2013; 8(7) e67617:1-12. doi:10.1371/journal. pone.0067617. 11. Carlson S. Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation in pregnancy and lactation. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009; 89(Suppl):678–684. 12. Greenberg JA, Bell SJ, Van Ausdal W. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy. Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2008; 1(4)(Suppl):162-169. 13. Prescott SL, Barden AE, Mori TA, Dunstan JA. Maternal fish oil supplementation in pregnancy modifies neonatal leukotriene production by cord-blood-derived neutrophils. Clin Sci. 2007; 113:409–416. 14. Koo WW, Warren L. Calcium and bone health in infants. Neonatal Netw. 2003; 22(5):23-37. 15. Helen IB, Smith L, Saarem K, Saugstad OD, Drevon CA. Maternal supplementation with very-long-chain n-3 fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation augments children’s IQ at 4 years of age. Pediatrics 2003; 111(1):e39-e44. 16. Hurry A, Laitinen K, Rautava S, Korkeamaki M, Isolauri E. Impact of maternal atopy and probiotic supplementation during pregnancy on infant sensitization: A double-blond placebo-controlled study. In Exp Allergy. 2008; 38:1342-1348.

Pregnancy Puts Mom and Baby at Higher Risk for Heatstroke

PrenateHeatStroke_v1As some women get further along in their pregnancies, they become more and more intolerant to heat. Some even experience hot flashes when in an air-conditioned building. For women in their second and third trimesters, the hottest months of the year can be almost unbearable, especially in humid climates or in the South.

Aside from causing physical discomfort and sweating, high temperatures and humidity can pose significant dangers to both mother and baby. Prolonged exposure can cause heat stroke, which can cause damage to the brain, vital organs, and can even cause death.1

Because of the extra weight they carry, pregnant women have an increased risk for heat stroke and heat exhaustion. Plus, expecting mothers’ bodies have to work overtime to cool down.

The most common symptoms of heat exhaustion (which can lead to heat stroke) include confusion, dizziness, pale skin, profuse sweating, fatigue or even fainting.1 Women also may experience headaches or feelings of light headedness.1 Dark-colored urine is also a sign of dehydration.1

Pregnant women should limit their exposure to high temperatures for prolonged periods. Avoid being outside during midday, when the sun is the hottest. Wear lighter color clothing if you must be outside during the heat of the day. Taking frequent breaks in cooler or air-conditioned environments also is advised.

Perhaps the most important thing a pregnant woman can do to prevent heat stroke and avoid heat exhaustion is to stay hydrated. A developing baby is dependent on getting fluids from the mother. Drinking eight glasses of water each day can help both mom and baby stay healthy in the heat. Avoiding caffeine and high levels of salt is also recommended. These can be dehydrating to both mothers and babies and are generally not recommended as part of a balanced prenatal nutrition regimen.

Prenatal Vitamins to Supplement Prenatal Nutrition

During pregnancy, a well-balanced diet is even more important as mothers-to-be are eating to support the nutritional needs of their babies, too. The Prenate® Vitamin Family is committed to promoting women’s health. Prenate® Vitamins can help support mother and baby throughout pregnancy and through labor and delivery. Even with a balanced and healthy diet, many women have trouble meeting their daily recommended intakes for certain vitamins and minerals. Talk to your doctor to see if a prenatal vitamin may be right for you to help fill nutritional gaps.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

REFERENCES: 1. WebMD. 2014. Heat Exhaustion. WebMD Website. Retrieved on July 15, 2016 from http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/heat- exhaustion#1.

Essential Nutrients in Your Prenatal Diet: Third Trimester

prenatal-nutrition-3rd-trimester

During the third trimester, week 28 – week 40 of pregnancy, the physical demands on the mother’s body reach their peak. Expecting moms may lose some of that energy they regained in the second trimester. Backaches, fatigue and stretch marks may occur as the baby and mom’s body grow bigger. Some women experience leaky breasts as the body prepares for breastfeeding. Others report lack of bladder control from the extra weight on their pelvis.

Mom may experience some undesirable physical symptoms, but baby experiences some remarkable milestones during the third trimester. Early in the third trimester the baby’s starts to receive signals from all five senses. The brain develops more than in any other trimester. The soft cartilage throughout the body is transformed into bones that make up the skeletal structure. Plus their skin, hair and nails develop. Around week 34 the baby starts to turn southward – a move that prepares them for delivery. And in the final weeks of pregnancy, the meconium (an infant’s first bowel movements) build up in the intestines.

Just as in the first and second trimesters, it is also important for expecting mothers to abstain from alcohol and smoking to support healthy growth of the baby. As in other stages of pregnancy and preconception, women should eat a well-balanced diet with plenty of whole grains, veggies and fruit. During the third trimester pregnant women should continue with an increased protein intake of 71 grams per day.1 Lean protein sources, like poultry and fish, are excellent options that are lower in calories and fat.

These essential nutrients should be included in every prenatal diet during the third trimester:

ironIron

Natural food sources of iron include lean red meat, poultry, legumes, vegetables and grains. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends that pregnant and lactating women get 18 mg of iron daily.2 During pregnancy, a woman’s blood volume increases 50 percent, and her need for hemoglobin is greater. During the third trimester the mother’s blood volume increases to meet the needs of the baby and placenta.3 Iron is an essential mineral in the body’s formation of hemoglobin, the red protein in the blood that is responsible for transporting oxygen throughout the body. Sufficient iron consumption during the third trimester helps a growing baby receive the amount of oxygen needed to develop a strong heart, lungs and muscles. Iron deficiency during pregnancy increases the risk of premature birth and low birthweight.3

dhaDHA

Because of the dramatic brain development that occurs in the third trimester, DHA is very important. Fish, eggs, meats, nuts, seeds, whole grains and dark leafy vegetables all naturally contain DHA. Oily fish, like mackerel, herring, salmon and trout, typically contain 10 times to 100 times more DHA than non-marine food sources.4 However, pregnant women need to be extremely careful when consuming marine food sources that contain DHA. Many of these fish contain high levels of mercury, and high levels of mercury can be toxic for both moms and their developing babies. In the right amount, between 500 mg and 2 grams per day, DHA is essential for growth and functional development of an infant’s brain.5,6 During the third trimester, when the baby’s body is dramatically developing, DHA aids in a healthy birth weight and the length of gestation.7,8

vitamin-kVitamin K

Leafy vegetables, like collards, turnips, spinach and kale are packed with vitamin K. The National Institutes of Health recommends that pregnant and lactating women get 90 mcg of vitamin K daily.9 For most Americans this amount is easily achieved through diet alone. However, vitamin K is critical in blood clotting. In the third trimester, the body is preparing for labor. During the delivery process, women lose around half a quart of blood.10 That number can double for cesarean births.10 Vitamin K in the third trimester can help prevent clotting and recovery from labor.

calciumCalcium

Milk, yogurt and cheeses are naturally rich in calcium. Some orange juices and cereals are also fortified with calcium. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends that pregnant and lactating women get 1,300 mg of calcium daily.2 The baby draws calcium from his mother’s bones if his needs are not met.11 Calcium and vitamin D work together to develop and maintain bone strength and healthy teeth.12 In the third trimester, the baby’s bones develop, putting an added emphasis on its importance. Calcium also helps the heart, nerves, muscles and other body systems develop properly.12 For expecting moms, calcium supplementation appears to be beneficial if they are at high risk of gestational hypertension.13 During the third trimester it may reduce systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well as the risk of preeclampsia.14

vitamin-dVitamin D

Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D. But because this nutrient is so important, milk, orange juice and cereals are often fortified with it. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends that pregnant and lactating women get 400 IU of vitamin D daily.2 One of the primary benefits of vitamin D is maintaining and building bone mineralization. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium, which helps build a strong skeletal system.15 Because a baby’s body doubles in length in the second trimester, it is especially important for an expecting mother to meet her daily vitamin D requirements during this time. Otherwise, nutrients are taken away from the mother and preferentially partitioned to the baby.16 However, vitamin D is not just about building and maintaining healthy bones. Ample vitamin D supplies may help reduce the risk of preeclampsia and gestational diabetes, which both occur more often in the third trimester.17

Fill Nutritional Gaps with Prenatal Vitamins

While a balanced diet is preferred during the third trimester, some women may have trouble meeting their daily recommended intake for certain vitamins and minerals. The Prenate® Vitamin Family offers a line of prenatal vitamins that are designed to carry moms and babies through preconception to pregnancy and into the weeks and months after delivery. These prenatal vitamins specifically address the essential nutrients both mom and baby need in the third trimester:

  • Prenate Mini® – a small, easy-to-swallow soft gel with complete prenatal nutritional support, including 350 mg of DHA
  • Prenate® Enhance – a prenatal vitamin with 400 mg DHA, 1000 IU of vitamin D and chelated iron
  • Prenate® Restore – a postnatal vitamin, appropriate during pregnancy, with probiotics, DHA and chelated iron

The Prenate® Vitamin Family helps support expecting moms with robust doses of key nutrients. Talk to your doctor to see if a prenatal vitamin may be right for you to help fill nutritional gaps.

prenatalnutrients-3rdtrimester

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

REFERENCES 1. Mayo Clinic. Pregnancy Diet: Focus on these essential nutrients. March 2014. Retrieved on June 10, 2016 from http:// http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/in-depth/pregnancy-nutrition/art-20045082?pg=2. 2. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dietary Supplement Labeling Guide: Appendix C. Daily Values for Infants, Children Less Than 4 Years of Age, and Pregnant and Lactating Women. April 2005. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/food/guidanceregulation/guidancedocumentsregulatoryinformation/dietarysupplements/ucm070620.htm on April 6, 2016. 3. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron. Office of Dietary Supplements, NIH Web site. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iron-HealthProfessional/. Reviewed February 11, 2016. Accessed August 17, 2016. 4. Brewer, S. 2005. DHA – Brian Food. Healthspan. Retrieved on December 16, 2015 from http://www.omega3forchildren.co.uk/articles/article_details.aspx?id=231. 5. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. FDA Announces Qualified Health Claims for Omega-3 Fatty Acids. 2004. Retrieved on December 16, 2015 from http://www.fda.gov/ SiteIndex/ucm108351.htm. 6. Horrocks, LA., Yeo, YK. Health benefits of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Pharmacy Res. 1999 Sep; 40(3):211-25. Retrieved on December 16, 2015 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ 10479465. 7. Storck S. Fetal Development. NIH MedlinePlus Website. http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/pregnancy-week-by-week/in-depth/prenatal-care/ art- 20045302?p=1. Updated September 30, 2013. Accessed December 29, 2014. 8. Greenberg JA, Bell SJ, Van Ausdal W. Omega-3 fatty acid supple- mentation during pregnancy. Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2008; 1(4)(Suppl):162-169. 9. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Vitamin K. Office of Dietary Supplements, NIH Web site. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminK-HealthProfessional/ Reviewed February 11, 2016. Accessed August 17, 2016. 10. Postpartum Hemorrhage. Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin Website. Retrieved on August 17, 2016 from http://www.chw.org/medical-care/fetal-concerns-center/conditions/pregnancy- complications/postpartum-hemorrhage/. 11. Pregnancy, breastfeeding and bone health. NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center Website. http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bone/Bone_Health/Pregnancy/ pregnancy_bone_health.pdf. Published January 2012. Accessed April 17, 2014. 12. University of Maryland Medical Center. April 12, 2011. Calcium. Retrieved from on http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/calcium November 20 2014. 13. Atallah AN, GJ Hofmeyr and L Duley. 2000. Calcium supplements during pregnancy for prevention of hypertensive disorders and related problems (Cochrane Review), in The Cochrane Library, Issue 3. 14. Bucher HC et al. 1996. Effect of calcium supplementation on pregnancy- induced hypertension and preeclampsia: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. JAMA 275(4): 1113–1117. 15. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Vitamin D. Office of Dietary Supplements, NIH Web site. http://ods.od.nih.gov/pdf/factsheets/VitaminD- HealthProfessional.pdf#h4. Reviewed November 10, 2014. Accessed April 17, 2015. 16. Picciano MF. Pregnancy and lactation: Physiological adjustments, nutritional requirements and the role of dietary supplements. J Nutr. 2003; 133(6) (suppl):1997-2002. 17. Bodnar, L. M., Catov, J. M., Simhan, H. N., Holick, M. F.et al., Maternal vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of preeclampsia. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 2007, 92, 3517–3522.

Prenate Mini®: Mini Prenatal Vitamin with Maximum Nutritional Value

prenatemini_july16_fbThe recommendations for many vitamins and minerals increase during pregnancy, so it’s important to consider options for nutritional support. Prescription prenatal vitamins can help cover nutritional gaps and may provide higher amounts of key nutrients than vitamins on the store shelf.

Prenate Mini® is a small prenatal vitamin with complete nutritional content for both moms and their babies. It is packed with 13 robust nutrients enhanced for absorption and tolerability to support both mom and baby throughout all stages of pregnancy.

Small Prenatal Vitamin

To give baby a good start in life, the sooner moms start taking a comprehensive vitamin supplement, the better. Folic acid, which helps promote healthy brain and spine development, works best when started early, even before pregnancy. When women are trying to become pregnant, they may not be used to taking pills or may have trouble swallowing them. Prenate Mini® is a small prenatal vitamin offered by the Prenate® Vitamin Family. Measuring only 0.5625 inch by 0.25 inch, it is around one-third the size of a penny. Its small size is designed to help expecting mothers stay the course when it comes to prenatal vitamin supplementation. Plus, it’s taken once daily, which is more convenient with today’s busy lifestyles. This small prenatal is one that women can start taking during preconception, can stay with throughout all stages of pregnancy, and can be taken after their babies are born.

No Vitamin Aftertaste

Prenate Mini® contains 25 mg of blueberry extract to eliminate any vitamin aftertaste and help improve its flavor.1 Blueberry extract also has-antioxidant benefits and reduces burp back, which is often associated with vitamin supplements.2 Blueberry extract works with antioxidants vitamin C and vitamin E in Prenate Mini® to help prevent omega-3 oxidation.2-5

Robust Nutritional Content

Prenate Mini® contains optimal nutrients in optimal amounts. The 13 robust ingredients in Prenate Mini® were chosen to address the needs of women during every step of the pregnancy cycle. The nutrient forms were selected for their high absorbency, especially for folate, DHA and iron.

  • Folate – The folate in Prenate Mini® is a traditional folic acid, plus a form that is absorbable for the 53% of women who have a mutation that prevents them from processing traditional folic acid.6-8 This combination means that baby gets the folic acid benefits needed to help ensure neural tube closure.
  • DHA – Prenate Mini® contains more DHA than any other leading prescription prenatal vitamin.1,18-31 Plus, the DHA in Prenate Mini® is derived from fish oil, rather than egg or plant-based sources. Marine sourced DHA helps with brain development, gestational length and weight.9-15 DHA received from the mother during breastfeeding helps with the baby’s cognitive and visual development and motor skills.9-15
  • Iron – The iron in Prenate Mini® is almost three times as absorbable as common forms, so a smaller dose is more efficient.16 Plus, the iron in Prenate Mini® is well tolerated in pregnant women and easier on the stomach than other forms. This helps ensure that mom and baby can attain their recommended intakes for iron, while minimizing its GI side effects.1,17

Check out the chart below to see how Prenate Mini® compares to other prescription prenatal vitamins on the market:

prenatemini_july16_pinterest

Coupons for Patient Savings on Small Prenatal Vitamin

As a robust, small prenatal vitamin from the Prenate® Vitamin Family, Prenate Mini® helps expecting mothers stay the course when it comes to their prenatal vitamin supplementation plan and provides maximum benefits for them and their babies. Most patients pay only $10 per refill! Click here to download a coupon for Prenate Mini®. Talk to your doctor to see if Prenate Mini® may be right for you to help fill nutritional gaps.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.

REFERENCES: 1. Prenate Mini® prescribing information, Avion Pharmaceuticals, LLC, 2014. 2. Velioglu YS, Mazza G, Gao L, Oomah BD. Antioxidant activity and total phenolics in selected fruits, vegetables, and grain products. J Agric Food Chem. 1998; 46(10):4113-4117. 3. Castrejon ADR, Eichholz I, Rohn S, Kroh LW, Huyskens-Keil S. Phenolic profile and antioxidant activity of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) during fruit maturation and ripening. Food Chem. 2008; 109:564–572. 4. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Vitamin C. Office of Dietary Supplements, NIH Website. http://ods.od.nih.gov/pdf/ factsheets/VitaminC HealthProfessional.pdf. Reviewed June 5, 2013. Accessed December 28, 2014. 5. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Vitamin C. Office of Dietary Supplements, NIH Website. http://ods.od.nih.gov/pdf/factsheets/VitaminE-HealthProfessional.pdf. Reviewed June 13, 2014. Accessed December 28, 2014. 6. Willems F, Boers G, Blom H, Aengevaeren W, Verheugt F. Pharmacokinetic study on the utilisation of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate and folic acid in patients with coronary artery disease. Br J Pharmacol. 2004; 141:825–830. 7. Czeizel AE, Dudás I, Paput L, Bánhidy F. Prevention of neural-tube defects with periconceptional folic acid, methylfolate, or multivitamins? Ann Nutr Metab. 2011; 58(4):263–271. 8. Molloy A, Daly S, Mills J, et al. Thermolabile variant of 5,10-methylenetet- rahydrofolate reductase associated with low red-cell folates: implications for folate intake recommendations. Lancet. 1997; 349:1591–93. 9. Greenberg JA, Bell SJ, Van Ausdal W. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy. Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2008; 1(4)(Suppl):162-169. 10. Storck S. Fetal Development. NIH MedlinePlus Website. http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/ pregnancy-week-by-week/in-depth/prenatal-care/art- 20045302?p=1. Updated September 30, 2013. Accessed December 29, 2014. 11. Carlson S. Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation in pregnancy and lactation. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009; 89(Suppl):678–684. 12. Cohen JT, Bellinger DC, Connor WE, Shaywitz BA. A quantitative analysis of prenatal intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and cognitive development. Am J Prev Med. 2005; 29(4): 366–374. 13. Greenberg JA, Bell SJ, Van Ausdal W. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy. Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2008; 1(4)(Suppl): 162-169. 14. Simopoulos AP, Leaf A, Salem N Jr. Workshop on the essentiality of and recommended dietary intakes for omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. J Am Coll Nutr. 1999; 18(5):487-489. 15. Cheruku SR, Montgomery-Downs HE, Farkas SL, Thoman EB, Lammi-Keefe CJ. Higher maternal plasma docosahexaenoic acid during pregnancy is associated with more mature neonatal sleep-state patterning. Amer J Clin Nutr. 2002; 76:608-613. 16. Data on File. Avion Pharmaceuticals LLC, Alpharetta, GA. 17. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron. Office of Dietary Supplements, NIH Website. http://ods.od.nih.gov/ factsheets/Iron-HealthProfessional/. Reviewed April 8, 2014. Accessed December 28, 2014. 18. NataChew® prescribing information, Eckson Labs, Sep 2012. 19. Prenate Pixie® prescribing information, Avion Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Jan 2015. 20. Vitafol® Nano prescribing information, Everett Laboratories, Inc, Mar 2014. 21. Vitafol® Ultra prescribing information, Everett® Laboratories, Inc, Sep 2013. 22. Vitafol One prescribing information, Everett Laboratories, Inc, Oct 2012. 23. OB CompleteTM Petite prescribing information, Vertical Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Sep 2014. 24. CitraNatal Harmony® prescribing information, Mission Pharmacal Co, Jun 2014. 25. Nexa® Plus prescribing information, Vertical Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Apr 2014. 26. OB CompleteTM ONE prescribing information, Vertical Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Sep 2014. 27. ConceptTM DHA prescribing information, US Pharmaceutical Corp, Jul 2009. 28. Data on File/A, Avion Pharmaceuticals, LLC, Alpharetta, GA. 29. CitraNatal® DHA prescribing information, Mission Pharmacal Co, Nov 2012. 30. SelectOB® +DHA prescribing information, Everett Laboratories, Inc, Mar 2014 31. Nestabs® prescribing information, Women’s Choice Pharmaceuticals website. http://www. wcpharma.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/nestabs.pdf. Undated. Accessed April 20, 2015.

Prenate® Restore: The First Prescription Prenatal Vitamin with Probiotics

Prenatal Vitamin with ProbioticsBy definition, prenatal nutrition addresses the nutrition recommendations for women before and during pregnancy. But with the stress of childbirth and the challenges of caring for an infant , moms can forget that their postnatal nutrition is also important.

Nutrition for Breastfeeding Moms and Babies

Because of the numerous benefits to mothers and their babies, breastfeeding exclusively for one to six months after delivery is recommended by both the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Academy of Pediatrics. These groups also recommend that mothers continue breastfeeding as other foods are introduced in months 7 to 12.1,2

Moms who breastfeed need increased nutritional intake to restore their reserves and support infant growth.3,4 During this time, nutrients are preferentially partitioned to mammary glands at the expense of maternal reserves.

Restore Mom, Nurture Baby

Prenate® Restore is a prenatal and postnatal vitamin with probiotics and 11 nutrient forms important nutrients. Its ingredients were selected to support the nutritional needs of mom and baby during pregnancy and postpartum, and specifically while breastfeeding. You can view the full ingredients list of ingredients in the chart to the right, as well as information about the specific benefits of some of the key ingredients in Prenate® Restore.

Prenatal Vitamins with ProbioticsKey Ingredients

  • Folic Acid – There are two forms of folate in Prenate® Restore: L-methylfolate and folic acid. In the United States, up to 53% of women have impaired folic acid metabolism from a common genetic mutation.5 This means that they are unable to process folic acid. The L-methyfolate in Prenate® Restore is bioavailable for all women regardless of genetic status.6
  • Vitamin D – Prenate® Restore also contains a level of vitamin D that meets or exceeds expert recommendations for this mineral.7,8 Vitamin D enables bone growth, promotes calcium absorption and influences skeletal and neurological development.7-11
  • Calcium – There are two forms of calcium in Prenate® Restore: calcium formate (in the form of Formical®) and calcium carbonate. Formical® is absorbed more rapidly and more efficiently by the body than other forms.12 Bone mass that is often lost during breastfeeding may be replenished by calcium formate, which is more bioavailable than citrate or carbonate.12,13
  • DHA – Women lose 50% of omega-3 stores during pregnancy. Prenate® Restore contains 400 mg of DHA, the most of any Prenate® vitamin, to help moms replenish those lost reserves.14 For mom, DHA reduces the risk of postpartum depression and improves sleep patterns.18-21 For baby, DHA improves cognitive and immune development, improves motor skills and inflammatory responses.14-17
  • Probiotics – Prenate® Restore contains probiotics Bacillus coagulans in the form of LactoSpore®. Probiotics support gastrointestinal and immune health in baby and mom. For baby, the probiotics create an environment that supports the body’s immune response to allergens.22 Probiotics also colonize the gut and keep bacteria in balance, which can protect the baby from pathogens and prevent diarrhea.22-24 For mom, probiotics reduce intestinal gas and incidences of diarrhea.25,26 Moms also experience the benefit of keeping the good and bad bacteria in the gut in balance.

Prenatal Vitamin with Probiotics for All Stages of Pregnancy

Prenate® Restore is a once-a-day, lactose-free, gluten-free and sugar-free softgel. It is a prenatal vitamin with probiotics that supports expecting mothers during pregnancy and postpartum, and specifically while breastfeeding. Prenate® Restore also can help your baby achieve optimal physical growth and promotes brain, immune system and gut development.27-29
In addition to providing nutritional support for mothers and babies, the Prenate® Vitamin Family offers prenatal vitamin coupons for Prenate® Restore. Click here to get your coupon now and pay only $10 per prescription refill! Talk to your doctor today to see if Prenate® Restore is right for you.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PRE- VENT ANY DISEASE.

REFERENCES
1.Breastfeeding: maternal and fetal aspects. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 361. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecolo- gists. Obstet Gynecol 2007 (Reaffirmed 2013); 109:479-480. 2. Eidelman A, Schanler RJ. Policy Statement: Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk. Pediatrics. 2012; 129(3):e827-e841.DOI: 10.1542/peds.2011-3552. 3. Picciano MF. Pregnancy and lactation: Physiological adjustments, nutritional requirements and the role of dietary supplements. J Nutr. 2003; 133(6) (suppl):1997-2002. 4. Breastfeeding report card: United States 2014. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site. http://www.cdc.gov/breast- feeding/pdf/2014breastfeedingreportcard.pdf. Published July 2014. Accessed April 17, 2015. 5. Molloy A, Daly S, Mills J, et al. Thermolabile variant of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase associated with low red-cell folates: implications for folate intake recommendations. Lancet. 1997; 349:1591–93. 6. Czeizel AE, Dudás I, Paput L, Bánhidy F. Prevention of neural-tube defects with periconceptional folic acid, methylfolate, or multivitamins? Ann Nutr Metab. 2011; 58(4):263–271. 7. COG. FAQ 001: Nutrition During Pregnancy. ACOG Website. http://www.acog.org/-/media/For-Patients/faq001. pdf?dmc=1&ts=20150218T1515531099. Published September 2013. Accessed February 18, 2015. 8. AAP. Statement of Endorsement: Dietary reference intakes for calcium and vita- min D. Pediatrics. 2012; 130:e1424. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-2590 9. AAP. Statement of Endorsement: Dietary reference intakes for calcium and vitamin D. Pediatrics. 2012; 130:e1424. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-2590 10. Dror D. Vitamin D in pregnancy. In: Watson RR, ed. Handbook of vitamin D in human health: Prevention treatment and toxicity. Human Health Handbooks. Vol. 4. The Nether- lands: Wageningen Academic Publishers; 2013:670-691 11. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Vitamin D. Office of Dietary Supple- ments, NIH Web site. http://ods.od.nih. gov/pdf/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional.pdf#h4. Reviewed November 10, 2014. Accessed April 17, 2015 12. Hanzlik RP, Fowler SC, Fisher DH. Relative bioavailability of calcium from calcium formate, calcium citrate, and calcium carbonate. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2005; 313(3):1217-1222. 13. Pregnancy, breastfeeding and bone health. NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center Website. http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bone/ Bone_Health/Pregnancy/pregnancy_bone_health.pdf. Published January 2012. Accessed April 17, 2014. 14. McGregor JA, French JI. Optimizing perinatal and maternal nutrition: omega-3 fatty acids and folic acid. Female Patient. 2008; (Suppl):19-23. 15. Carlson S. Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation in pregnancy and lactation. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009; 89(Suppl):678–684. 16. Greenberg JA, Bell SJ, Van Ausdal W. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy. Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2008; 1(4)(Suppl):162-169. 17. Prescott SL, Barden AE, Mori TA, Dunstan JA. Maternal fish oil supplementation in pregnancy modifies neonatal leukotriene produc- tion by cord-blood-derived neutrophils. Clin Sci. 2007; 113:409–416. 18. Cheruku SR, Montgomery-Downs HE, Farkas SL, Thoman EB, Lammi-Keefe CJ. Higher maternal plasma docosahexaenoic acid during pregnancy is associated with more mature neonatal sleep-state patterning. Amer J Clin Nutr. 2002; 76:608-613. 19. Akabas SR, Deckelbaum RJ. Summary of a workshop on n_3 fatty acids: current status of recommendations and future directions. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006; 83(Sup- pl):1536S– 1538S. 20. Wojcicki JM, Heyman MB. Maternal omega-3 fatty acid supplementation and risk for perinatal maternal depression. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2011; 24(5): 680–686. 21. Markhus MW, Skotheim S, Graff IE, et al. Low omega-3 index in pregnancy is a possible biological risk factor for postpartum depression. PLoS ONE. 2013; 8(7) e67617:1-12. doi:10.1371/journal. pone.0067617. 22. Huurre A, Laitinen K, Rautava S, Korkeamaki M, Isolauri E. Impact of maternal atopy and probiotic supplementation during pregnancy on infant sensitiza- tion: A double-blind placebo-controlled study. Clin Exp Allergy. 2008; 38:1342–1348. 23. Kalliomaki M, Antoine JM, Udo H, Rijkers GT, Wells JM, Mercenier A. Guidance for substantiating the evidence for beneficial effects of probiotics: prevention and manage- ment of allergic diseases by probiotics. J Nutr. 2010; 140(suppl):713S–721S. 24. Chandra RK. Effect of Lactobaccilus on the inci- dence and severity of acute rotavirus diarrhoea in infants. A prospective placebo-controlled double-blind study. Nutr Res. 2002; 22(1):65-69. 25. Kalman DS, Schwartz HI, Alvarez P, Feldman S, Pezzullo JC, Krieger DR. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel-group dual site trial to evaluate the effects of a Bacillus coagulans-based product on functional intestinal gas symptoms. BMC Gastroenterol. 2009; 9:85. doi:10.1186/1471-230X-9-85. 26. Cui YL, Won FC, Tan DL, Wu SH. Efficacy of Bacillus coagulans tablets in the treatment of acute and chronic diarrhea. Int J Immunother. 2004. 20(1):17-22. 27. Koo WW, Warren L. Calcium and bone health in infants. Neonatal Netw. 2003; 22(5):23-37. 28. Helen IB, Smith L, Saarem K, Saugstad OD, Drevon CA. Maternal supplementation with very-long-chain n-3 fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation augments children’s IQ at 4 years of age. Pediatrics 2003; 111(1):e39-e44. 29. Hurry A, Laitinen K, Rautava S, Korkeamaki M, Isolauri E. Impact of maternal atopy and probiotic supplementation during pregnancy on infant sensitization: A double-blond placebo-controlled study. In Exp Allergy. 2008; 38:1342-1348.